'I can't live here anymore, it's every week': Airbnb and Stayz apartments are turning into 24-hour party pads – and neighbours are powerless to stop them

There are about 26,000 Airbnb listings in Victoria and about 40,000 in New South Wales that continue to thrive in an unregulated industry (stock image) Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4630778/Airbnb-listings-turning-non-stop-party-houses.html#ixzz4kmqhEBTg  Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

There are about 26,000 Airbnb listings in Victoria and about 40,000 in New South Wales that continue to thrive in an unregulated industry (stock image)

Read more: http://www.dailymail.co.uk/news/article-4630778/Airbnb-listings-turning-non-stop-party-houses.html#ixzz4kmqhEBTg 
Follow us: @MailOnline on Twitter | DailyMail on Facebook

Neighbours of homes being listed on Airbnb and Stayz say life is becoming unbearable as the places next door become non-stop party pads. 

About 40,000 properties in NSW are listed on Airbnb and 26,000 in Victoria in an growing industry that remains largely unregulated, News.com.au reported. 

The Town That Said Yes To Nuclear Waste Dump

The Australian  |  Friday 23 June 2017

Wheat farmer Andrew Baldock with wife Dale and children Lucy and Jack on their Kimba property, proposed site of a nuclear waste dump. Picture: Kelly Barnes

Wheat farmer Andrew Baldock with wife Dale and children Lucy and Jack on their Kimba property, proposed site of a nuclear waste dump. Picture: Kelly Barnes

The thought of having a nuclear waste ¬dump in your backyard would be a step too far for many. 

But for wheat farmer Andrew Baldock and the majority of his fellow residents in the shrinking rural South Australian town of Kimba, the promise of a $10 million community fund and better internet was enough to convince them that the positives outweighed the negatives.

Mr Baldock, a father of two, hopes Kimba’s “yes” vote for a nuclear waste dump on South Australia’s Eyre Peninsula will kickstart the town’s shrinking rural economy, which has seen a steady exit of businesses and people over the past two decades.

Kimba’s 700 residents have for years been divided on whether to allow a waste dump near the town, but this week voted 396 to 294 in favour of advancing consultation on building a low- and medium-level facility on the town’s edge.

Mr Baldock and his brother stand to inherit from their parents one of the two farms nominated to house the nuclear waste dump.

Residents powerless to stop Airbnb ‘party houses’

Watergate residents are fed up with noisy guests.Source:Supplied

Watergate residents are fed up with noisy guests.Source:Supplied

A LOBBY group fighting the growing trend of short-stay “party houses” in high-rise apartment blocks claims platforms like Airbnb and Stayz are increasingly bringing alcohol-fuelled violence and unruly behaviour to residential areas.

We Live Here, which represents residents of more than 200 buildings in inner-city and suburban Melbourne, says communities in regional Victoria are beginning to speak out against the rapidly rising, unregulated commercial short-stay industry.

Independent Schools: Building For The Future

The NSW Minister for Education, the Hon Rob Stokes MP, today launched Independent Schools: Building for the Future, an initiative of the Association of Independent Schools of NSW (AISNSW) to help independent schools contribute to the education of a rapidly growing population.

Dr Geoff Newcombe AM, Chief Executive of AISNSW, said NSW Government projections anticipated an additional 270,000 students for NSW in the next 15 years – of which 70,000 will be enrolled in independent schools.

“This requires a coordinated and collaborative response and our initiative Independent Schools: Building for the Future is aimed at starting the discussion, identifying options and supporting our member schools into a period of unprecedented levels of enrolments,” said Dr Newcombe.

To commence the initiative, two research papers were released – a report commissioned from McCrindle Research to determine the projected demand for new independent school infrastructure, and a survey undertaken by AISNSW to determine capacity to absorb new enrolments within existing or expanded infrastructure.

Dr Newcombe said the reports had found the following:

·       By 2031 there will be an additional 270,000 school aged students, with 70,000 of these expected to attend independent schools.  This growth in the school education sector over the next 15 years will be three times greater than the growth rate of the last 15 years.

·       This increase represents enrolment growth in the independent school sector of almost 35% between 2016 and 2031 based on current market share, and up to 38% with a marginal increase in market share during that period.

·       Growth among the school age population to 2031 is expected to be highest in Sydney’s main urban centres – with Camden, Parramatta, Sydney, Strathfield and the Hills Local Government Areas all expecting growth of more than 50% in the number of young people aged between 15-19 years old.

·       Most of the demand for independent schools is expected to be in areas serving communities in the lower socio-economic range, with 70% of the demand likely to be met by low fee independent schools.

·       A survey of 345 independent schools across NSW found that 76% of independent schools are currently planning to accommodate an additional 61,400 students through the expansion of existing schools, either on current sites or through the establishment of new schools and campuses.

·       Capital development of at least $5.2 billion will be required to build new learning spaces and other support infrastructure to accommodate the extra students beyond what is currently planned for.

·       The notional savings to the NSW Government for the capital expenditure over this 15 year period will likely be in excess of $5 billion if the independent sector is able to accommodate the additional students.

·       The cumulative operational savings to the NSW Government due to enrolments in independent schools is estimated to be in excess of $46 billion thanks to the contribution of private funds and donations.

“We are ensuring that independent schools meet these future challenges and continue to be a significant contributor in educating students across NSW,” said Dr Newcombe.

Dr Newcombe said Independent Schools: Building for the Future will also incorporate a number of other elements designed to help Independent schools access the necessary infrastructure funding required.

“The next phase in the initiative is to help schools develop innovative partnerships to cover the costs of building high quality learning spaces.”

In launching Independent Schools: Building for the Future, Minister Stokes said the NSW Government needed non-government schools to take their share of enrolments to lessen the burden on the NSW taxpayer and to ensure parents continued to have a choice of schooling options.

“The magnitude of population growth in this State and the resulting demand for school enrolments requires a planned and visionary response from schooling providers, whether they be government, independent or Catholic schools.

“The infrastructure we need for the next 10 to 20 years must be built now so it is a great pleasure to be working closely with the Independent schools sector on this critical issue for the NSW Government and the whole community,” Minister Stokes said.

RFS says don't mess with Fire and Emergency Services Levy

Backflip: NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian has sought to find a "better and fairer" way of collecting the fire and emergency services levy. Photo: SMH.

Backflip: NSW Premier Gladys Berejiklian has sought to find a "better and fairer" way of collecting the fire and emergency services levy. Photo: SMH.

Rural Firefighters have asked the State Government to not mess with the Fire and Emergency Services Levy (FESL).

In contrast, the Hilltops Council has committed to working with the Government to find an equitable solution to the FESL dilemma.

Hidden feather patterns tell the story of birds

Three breast feathers from three individual Streaked Shearwater birds (Calonectris leucomelas), scanned simultaneously in high resolution X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Regular banding of the element zinc can be seen along the length of the feathers. 

Three breast feathers from three individual Streaked Shearwater birds (Calonectris leucomelas), scanned simultaneously in high resolution X-ray fluorescence microscopy. Regular banding of the element zinc can be seen along the length of the feathers. 

Shearwaters are migratory marine birds that travel in a figure-of-eight pattern between the coasts of Siberia and Japan to Tasmania.

Placing one of the undistinguished grey feathers from a shearwater into the brilliant light of the X-ray fluorescence microscopy beam reveals something unexpected.

Kimba votes on nuclear waste

Experts: Nuclear experts Dr Geoff Currie, Mark Moore and Hef Griffiths visited Kimba to discuss the potential nuclear waste facility during the consultation period.

Experts: Nuclear experts Dr Geoff Currie, Mark Moore and Hef Griffiths visited Kimba to discuss the potential nuclear waste facility during the consultation period.

Community members in and around Kimba have until June 21 to take part in the postal ballot on the National Radioactive Waste Management Facility.

The ballot asks community members whether or not they would support the two nominated sites in Kimba, at Napandee and Lyndhurst, moving into phase two of the investigation process.

NSW RFS Association reacts cautiously to levy delay

THE NSW Rural Fire Service Association (RFSA) has reacted cautiously to the NSW Government’s announcement to delay the introduction of the Fire and Emergency Services Levy (FESL), saying that any review must not trigger changes to the amount of money which has been guaranteed for rural fire-fighting services.

The RFSA is a supporter of the previous model of collecting the levy through insurance policies and insurers and was very vocal about the pitfalls of changing to a levy implemented on property holders by local councils.  

Major accounting body flags 'next disruptor'

Accounting firms with a social purpose beyond profit are set to be the next disruptor in financial services, according to one major accounting body, giving firms the potential to have an impact beyond their transactional work. 

Speaking to Accountants Daily CA ANZ’s general manager of Lifelong Learning, Stephen Carpenter, said that purpose outside of profit - such as charitable goals - is set to disrupt the accounting industry and wider business environment.

Purpose beyond profit

Image: Businesses are increasingly considering how they can benefit communities, and improve relationships with staff (Thomas Barwick/Getty)

Image: Businesses are increasingly considering how they can benefit communities, and improve relationships with staff (Thomas Barwick/Getty)

Businesses are looking for ways to improve the impact of their operations, and achieve more than a financial return. There is a new focus on supply chains, staff relations, and effects on communities.

Next week Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand are holding a conference with the theme of purpose beyond profit.

Don't Mess With the Amount Guaranteed to Fight Fires and Protect the Community

The NSW Rural Fire Service Association (RFSA) has reacted cautiously to the NSW Government’s announcement to delay the introduction of the Fire and Emergency Services Levy (FESL), saying that any review must not trigger changes to the amount of money which has been guaranteed for rural fire-fighting services.

The RFSA is a supporter of the previous model of collecting the levy through insurance policies and insurers and was very vocal about the pitfalls of changing to a levy implemented on property holders by Local Councils. However, with the Government’s strong commitment to follow other States into a property-based model, the RFSA worked closely with the Government to secure the best interests of its members.

“The Treasurer, the Hon. Dominic Perrottet MP, has provided us with a commitment that changes to the way the levy is collected and administered, will not impact on our 74,000 volunteer and salaried rural fire fighters, and that any unspent allocations can be rolled into the next financial year without penalty,” said RFSA President Ken Middleton.

“If the Government wishes to review the means of collecting the FESL that is their prerogative, but we have been provided with guarantees and we would not want to see those undertakings compromised by model changes.”

The RFSA calls on the Government to guarantee that all of the promises made over the last two years about the protection of rural fire-fighting services and funding, will not be compromised.

“We know this is a Government that listens, and they heard our concerns and opposition, but we need to make sure our commitments still stand.”

Insurers forced to pass on costs after fire levy backflip

Insurance Council of Australia's Campbell Fuller said insurers were not consulted on the levy delay and the decision was shocking.

Insurance Council of Australia's Campbell Fuller said insurers were not consulted on the levy delay and the decision was shocking.

Households can expect heftier insurance bills after the NSW Government dumped its controversial fire levy, insurers warn.

The government proposed the Fire and Emergency Services Levy as a fairer system that would save the average fully insured property owner about $47 a year.

Policies likely to rise says agency

A promised drop to the cost of home insurance policies has been delayed, following changes to the Fire and Emergency Services Levy (FESL).

In a statement on Tuesday, Premier Gladys Berejiklian said the government would defer the introduction of the FESL to ensure small to medium businesses did not face an unreasonable burden in their contribution to NSW’s fire and emergency services.

Government levy move welcomed, but residential factor should be reviewed: councillor

Cr Kevin Crameri.

Cr Kevin Crameri.

The state government should listen to residents as well as the small business lobby when it came to reviewing the maligned Fire and Emergency Services Levy (FESL), according to a local councillor.

Premier Gladys Berejiklian yesterday (Tuesday) announced the government would defer the July 1 introduction of the FESL and signalled it could be dumped altogether following a backlash over sharp increases in what some property owners would pay.