‘It’s confronting’: Asher Keddie felt proud covering the sensitive topic of stillbirth on Offspring

Asher Keddie says last night’s episode was one of her favourites. Picture: Channel 10

Asher Keddie says last night’s episode was one of her favourites. Picture: Channel 10

AUSTRALIAN drama Offspring has been praised for it’s inclusion of a controversial stillbirth storyline in last night’s episode.

The Channel 10 show followed a tragic plot in which Asher Keddie’s Nina Proudman had to help first-time mother Shanti, played by Caroline Brazier, deliver a stillborn daughter. Only to discover that she herself was pregnant.

UPDATE: Residents ready to fight on if Woolworths adopts 'Plan B' on Taren Point supermarket

Mayor Carmelo Pesce and Miranda MP Eleni Petinos with residents fitghting the proposal.

Mayor Carmelo Pesce and Miranda MP Eleni Petinos with residents fitghting the proposal.

Residents will fight on if Woolworths refuses to take “no” for an answer when Sutherland Shire Council rejects the retail giant’s bid for a new supermarket at Taren Point.

The council’s Planning Committee has unanimously rejected the rezoning application and its recommendation will be rubber stamped at the full council meeting on August 21 (see below).

Kimba landowners visit Lucas Heights nuclear facility

NUCLEAR WASTE: ANSTO chief nuclear officer Hef Griffiths, Michelle Rayner and Brett Rayner with the most radioactive waste on site at Lucas Heights.

NUCLEAR WASTE: ANSTO chief nuclear officer Hef Griffiths, Michelle Rayner and Brett Rayner with the most radioactive waste on site at Lucas Heights.

A Kimba couple who have volunteered part of their property for a National Radioactive Waste Management Facility got to see first hand how a nuclear facility works when they visited the Lucas Heights facility last week.

Brett and Michelle Rayner visited the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO) in Sydney’s Lucas Heights to see how nuclear waste is processed and stored.

A Gem of an Opportunity: ANSTO Minerals Calls for 2018 Interns

ANSTO Minerals is calling on students completing a Chemical Engineering, Industrial Chemistry or Chemistry university degree to put their hands up for an opportunity to work hands-on in their field.

Students will have the opportunity to work with some of the nation’s brightest minds on a range of exciting projects, providing invaluable insight and knowledge to help students forge their careers.

The Year in Industry Program gives students approaching their final year of study the chance to get behind the scenes at the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO).

The paid internship within ANSTO Minerals will see the students apply their theoretical knowledge to gain practical experience, assisting a team with world-leading expertise in areas such as rare earth processing.

Adrian Manis from ANSTO Minerals, said this is a wonderful opportunity to work on the frontline of groundbreaking research

“As part of the ANSTO Minerals team, the Year In Industry students will be working alongside leading scientists and engineers, which is a rare opportunity for university students,” Manis said.

“ANSTO Minerals also works very closely with industry, meaning that this is a unique experience to put the skills you learn at university to the test, and see them have real impacts within the minerals industry.

“We are looking for students with a positive attitude and excellent interpersonal skills who have an interest in working in a hands-on research and development environment.

“Gaining practical experience outside the classroom is important, as it gives you the chance to test out all that knowledge you’ve gained, and it’s also a way to learn new things and to see what you are most interested in.

“ANSTO works in all areas of science – producing potentially lifesaving nuclear medicines and using nuclear science to solve problems and find solutions in areas such as health, the environment and industry.

“ANSTO Minerals takes our scientific expertise and applies it to problems found in industry, to improve practices and methodologies.

“Here at ANSTO we strongly support investing in the next generation of scientists and researchers by providing programs such as the Year In Industry program, and we encourage all eligible students to apply.”

To be eligible students must be in the penultimate year of study for their Chemistry, Chemical Engineering or related degree, with at least one full year of study remaining.

For further technical information relating to this position please refer to the Position Information Package or contact Adrian Manis on +61 (02) 9717 9214. For all other queries please contact the Early Career Talent and Development team on +61 (02) 9717 3094.

Airbnb hosts could be slapped with a 'nuisance tax' and be forced to pay compensation to neighbours who complain about unruly guests

Building manager of Watergate Apartments (pictured) Marshall Delves said the building, dubbed as 'Partygate', was 'out of control' with parties and drug dealers using short-stays to facilitate their distribution

Building manager of Watergate Apartments (pictured) Marshall Delves said the building, dubbed as 'Partygate', was 'out of control' with parties and drug dealers using short-stays to facilitate their distribution

Airbnb hosts who rent out their homes to rowdy guests may have to pay their neighbours compensation under a proposed state government plan.

The extra fee is one of several proposals aimed at managing the short-term rental market being considered by the NSW government this week, according to The Daily Telegraph

Scholarships awarded to young Māori forging path in accounting

Four young Māori are to receive prestigious scholarships and internships to further their studies in accounting- a profession where Māori are significantly under-represented despite significant growth in the industry.

Each year, Chartered Accountants Australia and New Zealand (CA ANZ) and the Ngā Kaitatau Māori o Aotearoa (National Māori Accountants Network - NKMoA) provide scholarships to bring more Māori into accounting.

Push for 40km/h limit when passing active emergency vehicles

David Wynd at Regentville Rural Fire Brigade. Picture: David Swift

David Wynd at Regentville Rural Fire Brigade. Picture: David Swift

VOLUNTEER firefighters are pleading with the NSW Government to introduce a law requiring drivers to slow to 40km/h when passing emergency vehicles which have slowed down or stopped.

This includes vehicles parked on the side of the road — such as ambos treating patients, and police assisting in crashes or directing traffic — with flashing lights or sirens.

Space agency on the cards as Government announces review of Australia's capabilities

ABC TV news  |  Thursday, 13 July 2017

Australia could soon have its own space agency, with the Government today announcing a review into Australia's space capabilities.

An interplanetary scientist from the Australian Nuclear Science and Technology Organisation (ANSTO), Dr Helen Maynard-Casely, has welcomed the announcement and highlighted the potential for the Australian economy.

Road rules to protect emergency workers

St George & Sutherland Shire Leader  |  Wednesday 12 July 2017

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AUSTRALIA’s emergency workers know the horrifying realities of the road toll all too well, as they respond to serious accidents on a daily basis.

All are committed to bringing down the road toll and any rules, and measures, which increase safety for drivers.

In New South Wales, I believe more needs to be done to protect emergency workers on the road – specifically - a new law that requires drivers to slow to 40 kilometres an hour when passing a stationary, or slow moving, emergency vehicle with flashing lights or sirens.

Drivers should only increase their speed again, when reaching a safe distance from the scene.

This would be consistent with steps Victoria and South Australia have taken to protect emergency service workers.

It is the same law we use in other areas of the community where vulnerable road users are present, like school zones, school buses and roadwork sites.

Tragically, a number of emergency workers have been killed and injured on Australian roads after being struck by passing vehicles or debris and a recent survey in Victoria also found out that one in five emergency service works said they had four or more ‘near misses’ while stopped on the roadside over the past three years.

As the representative Association of the 74,000 members of the NSW Rural Fire Service, I believe this measure is vital in protecting NSW RFS members, and all emergency services workers.

Our emergency service workers have stressful and demanding jobs, protecting the community when they are often at their most vulnerable.

It is imperative that they can do their job without fear of being injured or killed by a passing vehicle.

Given the frequency of interstate fire-fighting arrangements during major emergencies, consistent road rules nationally would be logical in minimising accidents and protecting the safety of emergency service workers, protecting the community, right across the nation. It would also assist drivers when travelling interstate.

The safety of our members is paramount, and the RFSA will continue to lobby and work with Government in advocating the adoption of a 40km per hour speed limit as a means to safeguard the safety of the people, who protect and safeguard the community.

Ken Middleton, RFSA President

Airbnb escapes tax time crackdown, but mum & dad hosts left with a bill: Marshall Delves

Commercial short-stay companies like Airbnb will this year deprive the Victorian Government of more than $14 million in uncollected GST.

Airbnb, and similar operators, only collect GST on the 5 percent to 15 percent ‘service fee’, rather than the entire booking cost. This means the state misses out on up to 95 percent of the GST applicable under current legislation. But conversely – or perversely –, this year hosts will pick up an extra bill, with the Australian Tax Office signalling a tax crackdown on users of the app.

Wearable device monitors baby in utero to cut stillbirth risk

‘So many complications’: Bree Amer-Wilkes and son Hunter, five months. Picture: Chris Pavlich

‘So many complications’: Bree Amer-Wilkes and son Hunter, five months. Picture: Chris Pavlich

A new wearable pregnancy device could help drive down the number of stillbirths by monit­oring the baby’s movement in utero.

Stillbirth Foundation Australia has teamed up with an innovation program backed by global consultancy PwC to help women’s digital health start-up Bloomlife further develop a device that can provide an early warning of possible ­problems.

Breakdown woes

Human resources expert Lindsay McMillan has found the main reason employees seek counselling is a breakdown in relationships at work and home.

In his Renewing Australian Workplaces report, McMillan analysed more than 300,000 hours of counselling and found that with big shifts in workplaces affected by technological changes and the rise in part-time work, a greater focus on relationships was needed.