Theatre duo prepare for their 'last hurrah' in HSC drama

Sydney Morning Herald | Sunday 25 August 2019

Asha Boswarva (behind) and Rebecca Burchett (front) have known each other since kindy and are both looking to acting for their future.Credit:Nick Moir

Asha Boswarva (behind) and Rebecca Burchett (front) have known each other since kindy and are both looking to acting for their future.Credit:Nick Moir

Before Asha Boswarva was juggling her final years of school with a role in the pay TV series Lambs of God, she and school mate Rebecca Burchett were performing in year four plays together.

The Redlands year 12 students have been friends since kindergarten. They are "like minds" who say their joint love of performing arts has made their relationship "grow and blossom".

Joel Hood raises $80k for Mito Foundation after daughter diagnosed

Herald Sun | Friday 23 August 2019

Joel and Sarah Hood with daughter Maeve, 3.

Joel and Sarah Hood with daughter Maeve, 3.

This weekend a McCrae family will attempt to walk more than 47,000 steps in a single day. The massive effort is expected to take more than seven hours to complete. Here's why they're doing it.

Maeve Hood, 3, can say only one word but that hasn't stopped the little girl from raising awareness about a rare condition.

Newstart Opal card? Push to lower fares for those living on $40 a day

Sydney Morning Herald | Monday 19 August 2019

Newstart recipient Tony Iltis often walks because he finds the cost of public transport too high. Credit:Janie Barrett

Newstart recipient Tony Iltis often walks because he finds the cost of public transport too high. Credit:Janie Barrett

When he can, Tony Iltis walks to appointments with job-search providers or Centrelink, instead of catching the train or bus. The ticket price is high for someone living on $40 a day on an unemployment benefit.

"Fares are really expensive when you're on a very low income," said Mr Iltis, 52, who lives near Parramatta. "You have to choose between a train fare and getting something to eat."

Spokesman for Exclusive Brethren hits back at sect claims

The Courier-Mail | Thursday 15 August 2019

Plymouth Brethren Christian Church spokesman Lloyd Grimshaw (left) said the faith has a charity, is misunderstood and they are not secretive nor a sect. Pic: Supplied

Plymouth Brethren Christian Church spokesman Lloyd Grimshaw (left) said the faith has a charity, is misunderstood and they are not secretive nor a sect. Pic: Supplied

It has 5000 Brisbane members and just received the green light for a new church in the city’s east, but criticism from well-known Australians has created a series of negative headlines. Now a spokesman and long-time member has hit back.

AN immensely private religious group says it’s misunderstood and is not an extremist sect and its members could be your neighbour, workmate or even your boss.

The Plymouth Brethren Christian Church, which has more than 5000 Brisbane members, have just been given the green light to build a new place of worship at Tingalpa.

The approval follows a lengthy and yet unsuccessful development application in Manly West that met fierce resistance from Manly West residents who claimed they did want the sect’s church in their neighbourhood.

The Brethren’s spokesman and longtime member Lloyd Grimshaw said there were many myths circulating about the faith, including that it was secretive, and they were simply not true.

Release of annual Reputation Risk Report for Independent Schools.

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Australian Public Affairs (APA) is proud to release its annual Reputation Risk Report for Independent Schools.

This year we have focused on the relationship of trust between independent schools and their students, parents, teachers, staff and alumni – how and why the relationship is changing and how schools can best respond.

The Report is based on an annual survey of Board members of independent schools and heads of schools, combined with our 25 years' of experience in working with hundreds of independent schools.

We presented the survey findings at the AISNSW’s Governance Symposium earlier this year and due to popular demand, are now releasing the report in written format.

You can obtain your copy of the report by clicking here. Please feel free to share the link across the independent schools sector.

I am always happy to discuss the findings with you in greater detail – simply call my office on 02 9234 3888 or my mobile on 0411 644 999.

Regards

Tracey

Bush accountants get mental health first aid training to help farmers through drought

ABC News | Tuesday 30 July 2019

Accountants say they often work with farmers whose financial struggles are affecting their mental health. (Supplied: Zara King)

Accountants say they often work with farmers whose financial struggles are affecting their mental health. (Supplied: Zara King)

Accountants based in regional areas are getting mental health first aid training to help them work with clients whose financial pressures are causing emotional distress.

The training is proving particularly helpful to those who find themselves confidants to farmers and graziers struggling with drought and other issues.


We’re now on the ground in Melbourne

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After several years of consistently strong growth, Australian Public Affairs has outgrown the bounds of a single central office and will be expanding to new offices in other Australian cities.

Starting in Melbourne, a growing practice with increased client needs justifies a more permanent presence to deliver even greater value.

Our new office at 101 Collins Street is open for business. Led by our Director, Nick Trainor, a former communications advisor to Federal Labor both in the Leader’s office and on the national campaign; we now have a local footprint to continue and expand our Victorian efforts.

Our focus will remain on public policy, regulated industries and complex stakeholder environments – finding the right communications mix to start conversations, forge coalitions and influence change.

If you would like to meet our Melbourne team, please contact us.

Unis gain benefit from investment in preschool education

The Australian | Wednesday 10 July 2019

The study shows how investment in early childhood education can be doubled in later years.

The study shows how investment in early childhood education can be doubled in later years.

Australia's multi-billion-dollar annual investment in early childhood education yields a positive economic return, with benefits that cascade through the education system up to university level, according to a new study.

The study, carried out by PricewaterhouseCoopers for social enterprise group The Front Project, is the first of its kind in Australia and found that the total economic benefit to parents, government and employers is as high as $2 of return for each $1 spent.

Feeling lonely at work?

ABC News | Monday 8 July 2019

Image:  Apparently nearly half of us feel lonely at work. (Pexels)

Image: Apparently nearly half of us feel lonely at work. (Pexels)

We hear a lot about the 'loneliness epidemic' and the health concerns it poses.

A new report suggests this loneliness seeps into our workplaces too — with almost 40 per cent of workers in Australia feeling lonely at work.

Guest:

Dr Lindsay McMillan, MD, Reventure

Interview with Kate Lynch, CEO, Stillbirth Foundation Australia

Sky News Live | Friday 5 July 2019

Interview with Kate Lynch, CEO, Stillbirth Foundation Australia.

Connell says more than 2000 babies are stillborn in Australia and statistics reveal the stillborn rates have been consistent in decades, but up to 1/3 of these are preventable through adequate education problems and national health campaigns.

Lynch says the definition of fetal death in Australia is after 20 weeks of gestation. She states the stillborn rates haven't changed.

Lynch states the government has accepted all 16 recommendations from last year's Senate inquiry. She says the stillborn rates in Australia could be reduced through research, further education for healthcare professionals in delivery and maternity care, and education for pregnant mothers.

Lynch points out the recommendations from the committee and the government funding focuses on public health policy which enables for the dissemination of vital information to pregnant moms. She states the package includes the submission of important information from research to doctors.

‘Hiddentragedy’:boost in funding for stillbirth research

Sydney Morning Herald | Thursday 4 July 2019

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The federal government has promised to invest over $50 million in stillbirth research as a report released today shows the rate of stillbirths and neonatal deaths in Australia has remained virtually unchanged for 20 years.

Health Minister Greg Hunt announced $52.4 millionin funding for perinatal services and support, including investment in stillbirth research, resource development, and improving the collection of national perinatal death data.

The announcement comes as a report released by the Australian Institute of Health and Welfare (AIHW) found that in 2015 and 2016, 5702 babies died in the perinatal period – a period of weeks immediately before,during and after birth.

AIHW spokesperson Dr Fadwa Al-Yaman said six babies are stillborn every day in Australia, and two babies die every day during the neonatal period of within 28 days of their birth.

‘‘Rates of perinatal death have remained relatively constantsince 1997,’’ Dr Al-Yaman said.

Professor Vicki Flenady, from the University of Queensland’s Centre of Research Excellence in Stillbirth, saidstillbirths make up the majority of perinatal deaths, and it’s those rates that remained unchanged.

‘‘There’s been a lack of real focus on these deaths,and a lackof appreciation of the fact that they are highly preventable,’’ Professor Flenadysaid.‘‘I think it’s driven by the fact that stillbirth is such a tragedy and it’s really hard to talk about, it’s often a hidden tragedy and what’s not seen can’t be fixed.’’

The Centre of Research Excellence in Stillbirth has received $3 million of the government’s fundingto help nationalise a project that aims to reduce the rate of stillbirth after 28 weeks of gestation.

Professor Flenady said she is confident the Australian Safe Baby Bundle project will reduce the rate by 20 per cent, in line with similar projects in the UK. ‘‘We’re looking at the potential of saving 2-300 babies’ lives every year if we get this implemented across these jurisdictions,’’ she said.

The project, which helps healthcare providers and mothers pick up on risk factors including slow baby growth and decreased fetal movement, will be spread from NSW, Victoria and Queensland to include the other states and territories, as well as rural and remote parts of Australia.

Mr Hunt said reducing the rate of stillbirth was a‘‘health and wellbeing priority’’.

Almost 30 per cent of all stillbirth deaths were caused by congenital anomaly, according to the AIHW report – however, the report said that data is complicated by the fact a proportion of those deaths were due to pregnancy terminations, including for some non-fatal abnormalities.

The second-highest cause of stillbirth, at 19.6 per cent, is unexplained death. Kate Lynch, chief executive of the Stillbirth Foundation Australia, said while further medical research was needed there were things people could do to reduce the risks.

‘‘Our advice to pregnant women is that they should go to sleep on their side from 28 weeks of pregnancy onwards, and pregnant mothers should seek immediate healthcare professional advice if they notice changes in their baby’s movements,’’ she said.